ROMAN HISTORY (LM)
cod. 1007457

Academic year 2024/25
1° year of course - Second semester
Professor
Alessandro PAGLIARA
Academic discipline
Storia romana (L-ANT/03)
Field
Discipline storiche, filosofiche, antropologiche e sociologiche
Type of training activity
Characterising
30 hours
of face-to-face activities
6 credits
hub: PARMA
course unit
in ITALIAN

Learning objectives

The Roman History (LM) course will focus on the political and institutional events of the empire from the crisis of the 3rd century to the death of Theodosius I, with particular emphasis on the reign of Flavius Claudius Julianus. Classes (which require a basic knowledge of Roman History and Latin) will also include a commented reading of the “Gratiarum actio de consulatu suo Iuliano imperatori” by Claudius Mamertinus. Studying the various proposed methods and the narrow focus on these specific issues will have as primary outcome the understanding of the structure and the contents of the selected subjects. However, focusing on the history of the Late Roman Empire (3rd-4th cent. AD) will also provide students with a thorough understanting of the methods employed in the general study of Roman history. From the knowledge and skills developed in the classroom and in coursework assignments students will learn how to handle the methodological tools needed to deal with other subjects and issues in the history of ancient Rome in a critical and self-aware manner.

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING SKILLS
The Roman History course (LM) will provide students with a thorough knowledge and understanding of the political, social and institutional history of the Roman world.

ABILITY TO APPLY KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
The Roman History course (LM) will provide students with the critical and methodological tools required to read and understand the different types of source for the study of the history of Rome, and thus the ability to apply knowledge and understanding to issues in addition to those covered in the lessons.

INDEPENDENCE OF JUDGEMENT
Lessons focus on the different types of source for the study of the history of Rome and their interaction with different aspects of historical reality. Students thus develop autonomy of judgement in reading ancient texts and interpreting historical facts.

COMMUNICATION SKILLS
At the end of the Roman History course (LM) students will have acquired the ability to present specialist contents related to the main events and issues in the field of Roman history clearly, verbally and/or in writing.

LEARNING SKILLS
Theoretical and disciplinary contents of the Roman History course (LM) should provide students with the methodological tools and learning abilities required for the continuation of studies and/or for specialist professional activities.

Prerequisites

1) University level knowledge of the history of ancient Rome: students (attending or not attending lessons) who have not taken the Roman History exam (at least 6 CFU) during the three-year degree are required to choose the recommended readings listed in point C of the examination bibliography;
2) high school level knowledge of Latin.

Course unit content

The Roman History (LM) course will focus on the political and institutional events of the empire from the crisis of the 3rd century to the death of Theodosius I, with particular emphasis on the reign of Flavius Claudius Julianus. Classes (which require a basic knowledge of Roman History and Latin) will also include a commented reading of the “Gratiarum actio de consulatu suo Iuliano imperatori” by Claudius Mamertinus.

Full programme

- - -

Bibliography

A) Students ATTENDING lessons:

1) anthology of ancient texts provided during classes (available on the Elly platform);
2) abstracts from Storia di Roma Einaudi, vol. 3.1., Turin 1993 (available on the Elly platform);
3) I. Tantillo, L'imperatore Giuliano, Roma-Bari, Laterza, 2019.

N.B. Highly recommended for ALL students is the use of a historical atlas of the ancient world, such as:
• M. BARATTA-P. FRACCARO et al., Atlante storico, Novara, Istituto geografico De Agostini, 1979;
• H. BENGTSON-V. MILOJCIC, Großer historischer Weltatlas, I. Teil (Vorgeschichte und Altertum), München, Bayerischer Schulbuch-Verlag, 1978;
• R. J. A. TALBERT, Atlas of Classical History, London, Routledge, 1985.

NON ITALIAN MOTHER TONGUE STUDENTS MAY CONTACT THE INSTRUCTOR FOR A SPECIFIC BIBLIOGRAPHY.

*

B) Students NOT ATTENDING lessons:

1) abstracts from Storia di Roma Einaudi, vol. 3.1., Turin 1993 (available on the Elly platform);
2) I. Tantillo, L'imperatore Giuliano, Roma-Bari, Laterza, 2019;
3) S. Mazzarino, La fine del mondo antico, Torino, Bollati Boringhieri, 2008 (or any other edition).

N.B. Highly recommended for ALL students is the use of a historical atlas of the ancient world, such as:
• M. BARATTA-P. FRACCARO et al., Atlante storico, Novara, Istituto geografico De Agostini, 1979;
• H. BENGTSON-V. MILOJCIC, Großer historischer Weltatlas, I. Teil (Vorgeschichte und Altertum), München, Bayerischer Schulbuch-Verlag, 1978;
• R. J. A. TALBERT, Atlas of Classical History, London, Routledge, 1985.

NON ITALIAN MOTHER TONGUE STUDENTS MAY CONTACT THE INSTRUCTOR FOR A SPECIFIC BIBLIOGRAPHY.

*
C) Students WHO HAVE NOT TAKEN THE ROMAN HISTORY EXAM (at least 6 CFU) during the three-year degree:

1) G. Geraci - A. Marcone, Storia romana, con la collaborazione di A. Cristofori e C. Salvaterra, IV edizione, Le Monnier Università - Mondadori Education, Milano, 2016;
2a) only students attending lessons: anthology of ancient texts provided during classes (also available on the Elly platform)
2b) only students not attending lessons: S. Mazzarino, La fine del mondo antico, Torino, Bollati Boringhieri, 2008 (or any other edition).

N.B. Highly recommended for ALL students is the use of a historical atlas of the ancient world, such as:
• M. BARATTA-P. FRACCARO et al., Atlante storico, Novara, Istituto geografico De Agostini, 1979;
• H. BENGTSON-V. MILOJCIC, Großer historischer Weltatlas, I. Teil (Vorgeschichte und Altertum), München, Bayerischer Schulbuch-Verlag, 1978;
• R. J. A. TALBERT, Atlas of Classical History, London, Routledge, 1985.

NON ITALIAN MOTHER TONGUE STUDENTS MAY CONTACT THE INSTRUCTOR FOR A SPECIFIC BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Teaching methods

Lessons (supplemented with teaching material uploaded on the Elly platform); commented reading of texts; discussion and exercises on sample texts.

Assessment methods and criteria

Assessment will take place during the final exam, which will consist of an oral interview on the different parts of the program. The aims of the exam are: 1) to assess knowledge of the main developments in Roman history from the origins to Late Antiquity, as well as the themes studied monographically (for students attending lessons, the more detailed knowledge will be assessed on the basis of documents studied in class, and for non-attending students, on the basis of the supplementary bibliography); 2) to evaluate the clarity of exposition, the mastery of required language, and appropriacy of candidate answers.

A fail mark is awarded for lack of an understanding of the minimum contents of the course, the inability to express oneself adequately, by a lack of autonomous preparation, the inability to solve problems related to information retrieval and the decoding of complex texts, and/or an inability to make independent judgments. A pass mark (18-23/30) is awarded to students demonstrating knowledge of the minimum, fundamental contents of the course, an adequate level of autonomous preparation and ability to solve problems related to information retrieval and the decoding of complex texts, as well as an acceptable level of ability in making independent judgments. Middle-range scores (24-27/30) are assigned to the student who produces evidence of a more than sufficient level (24-25/30) or good level (26-27/30) in the evaluation indicators listed above. Higher scores (from 28/30 to 30/30 cum laude) are awarded on the basis of the student’s demonstration of a very good or excellent level in the evaluation indicators listed above.

Other information

Classes start on February 2024.